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Auto & Fleet Mechanic

5160 Pentecost Drive #C
Modesto, CA 95356

When you bought your new car what was the first question you asked? How many miles per gallon? What is the price? What kind of audio features it had?

Most people don't think to ask whether it uses traditional freon or the new R1234yf Refrigerant in the air conditioning system.

If you have a vehicle that uses the new R1234yf, what do you need to know about it? This article will tell you all about the switch and what to expect at the service shop if you take your vehicle in for an air conditioning recharge.

Why Did the Refrigerant Type Change Anyway?

As scientists continue to gather data, more and more products are discovered to be harmful to the ozone layer. First, it was aerosol sprays like hairspray, then propellant based medications like asthma inhalers, and then it was found that the refrigerant used to cool your air was also harmful.

Global warming has led manufacturers of all sorts of products to rethink their effects on the world. Many of the manufacturing and building industries are changing to be greener and more sustainable. The same with automobile manufacturers.

So, the transition to the cleaner R1234yf began in 2015. The previous standard R-134a has a Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 1300 and R-1234yf's GWP is less than 1. R1234yf also has the lowest flammability rating of any engine-component related liquid.

R1234yf is composed of a combination of hydrogen, fluorine, and carbon atoms. It's considered a hydrofluoro-olefin, or HFO, refrigerant.

System Changes in Vehicles Using R1234yf

Previous models appear practically identical to the new models outside of a few key differences. Cars using the new refrigerant will have an inline heat exchanger, or IHX, containing two concentric chambers. This is missing in previous models.

The purpose of the IHX is to let the system cool the air below the condensation temperature which improves the overall system efficiency.

There will also be new service ports and caps. This is a proofing method to make sure the tech will notice something is different. These new ports and caps make it impossible to use older versions avoiding unintentional damage to your system.

These new systems are also fitted with a stronger evaporator with less likelihood of leaking. They've included an O-ring on the ports and caps to prevent lower temperatures from causing the system to malfunction.

Wondering if your car uses the new car refrigerant? Check out this list of manufacturers and models.

New System Equals Higher Service Prices: But We Can Help!

So, as a vehicle owner, how does this affect you? First, you'll notice a price difference the first time you take your vehicle for a refrigerant recharge. The national average price of an R134A recharge in 2018 was around $200-$300 with the cost of the previous standard R134A refrigerant at $30 per pound. However, the average current market price of the R1234yf refrigerant is $120 per pound. This drives the cost up.

Additionally, you'll need to find a mechanic or dealership that is well-versed in and capable of using this new type of freon. As a result of changes to the air conditioning system on the vehicle as mentioned previously, not all car shops are equipped to handle the new ac freon.

In fact, as of this writing, Auto & Fleet Mechanic 1 of only 3 auto repair shops in Modesto, CA that offer this service besides the dealerships. The biggest difference?

When you decide to use us, you know you're getting a better price than any of the dealerships.

Can I Use the Old Refrigerant and Save Some Money?

The new price tag comes as a shock to those who have been vehicle owners for some time. The steep jump may have you wondering if you can use the old stuff instead. But, similar to going back to standard oil after using full synthetic, it's not advisable.

Since the new systems have been customized for the new refrigerant it's a bad idea to retrofit back to R134A. Changing the refrigerant could interfere with the lubrication of the system and gives you a higher probability of contamination of the system.

It's best to stick with the manufacturer's recommendations for all the components of the car to keep it running in tip-top shape. But, the good news is that you don't have to perform a recharge every year, or even every two, as part of your normal maintenance schedule.

The best time to schedule a recharge is when you notice the air blowing warmer than normal. So, you could go quite a long time between charges.

R1234yf Is Here to Stay: The New Industry Standard

While new regulations and changes that end up costing you more money are sometimes annoying, they are also necessary. Considering that the global warming implications of the previous R134A are about 1400 times the impact of this new R1234yf freon, it's worth it.

The most important part is treating your vehicle well. Get onto a regular maintenance schedule. Budget for your inevitable recharge in the future. The more you take care of your vehicle, the less likely you'll be caught with an unexpected repair.

Having trouble with your vehicle? AC not running so cool? Bring your car into the experts here at Auto & Fleet Mechanic. We have been keeping the Modesto, California area running since the last millennium.

Not sure what service your car may need? Request an appointment with us today and we will get you back on the road safely and quickly.

Additionally, we are offering an incentive for first-time customers when they sign up here.

Want to improve the performance of your vehicle's air conditioner? Start with your refrigerant. Here's your ultimate guide to R1234yf freon.

When you bought your new car what was the first question you asked? How many miles per gallon? What is the price? What kind of audio features it had?

Most people don't think to ask whether it uses traditional freon or the new R1234yf Refrigerant in the air conditioning system.

If you have a vehicle that uses the new R1234yf, what do you need to know about it? This article will tell you all about the switch and what to expect at the service shop if you take your vehicle in for an air conditioning recharge.

Why Did the Refrigerant Type Change Anyway?

As scientists continue to gather data, more and more products are discovered to be harmful to the ozone layer. First, it was aerosol sprays like hairspray, then propellant based medications like asthma inhalers, and then it was found that the refrigerant used to cool your air was also harmful.

Global warming has led manufacturers of all sorts of products to rethink their effects on the world. Many of the manufacturing and building industries are changing to be greener and more sustainable. The same with automobile manufacturers.

So, the transition to the cleaner R1234yf began in 2015. The previous standard R-134a has a Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 1300 and R-1234yf's GWP is less than 1. R1234yf also has the lowest flammability rating of any engine-component related liquid.

R1234yf is composed of a combination of hydrogen, fluorine, and carbon atoms. It's considered a hydrofluoro-olefin, or HFO, refrigerant.

System Changes in Vehicles Using R1234yf

Previous models appear practically identical to the new models outside of a few key differences. Cars using the new refrigerant will have an inline heat exchanger, or IHX, containing two concentric chambers. This is missing in previous models.

The purpose of the IHX is to let the system cool the air below the condensation temperature which improves the overall system efficiency.

There will also be new service ports and caps. This is a proofing method to make sure the tech will notice something is different. These new ports and caps make it impossible to use older versions avoiding unintentional damage to your system.

These new systems are also fitted with a stronger evaporator with less likelihood of leaking. They've included an O-ring on the ports and caps to prevent lower temperatures from causing the system to malfunction.

Wondering if your car uses the new car refrigerant? Check out this list of manufacturers and models.

New System Equals Higher Service Prices: But We Can Help!

So, as a vehicle owner, how does this affect you? First, you'll notice a price difference the first time you take your vehicle for a refrigerant recharge. The national average price of an R134A recharge in 2018 was around $200-$300 with the cost of the previous standard R134A refrigerant at $30 per pound. However, the average current market price of the R1234yf refrigerant is $120 per pound. This drives the cost up.

Additionally, you'll need to find a mechanic or dealership that is well-versed in and capable of using this new type of freon. As a result of changes to the air conditioning system on the vehicle as mentioned previously, not all car shops are equipped to handle the new ac freon.

In fact, as of this writing, Auto & Fleet Mechanic 1 of only 3 auto repair shops in Modesto, CA that offer this service besides the dealerships. The biggest difference?

When you decide to use us, you know you're getting a better price than any of the dealerships.

Can I Use the Old Refrigerant and Save Some Money?

The new price tag comes as a shock to those who have been vehicle owners for some time. The steep jump may have you wondering if you can use the old stuff instead. But, similar to going back to standard oil after using full synthetic, it's not advisable.

Since the new systems have been customized for the new refrigerant it's a bad idea to retrofit back to R134A. Changing the refrigerant could interfere with the lubrication of the system and gives you a higher probability of contamination of the system.

It's best to stick with the manufacturer's recommendations for all the components of the car to keep it running in tip-top shape. But, the good news is that you don't have to perform a recharge every year, or even every two, as part of your normal maintenance schedule.

The best time to schedule a recharge is when you notice the air blowing warmer than normal. So, you could go quite a long time between charges.

R1234yf Is Here to Stay: The New Industry Standard

While new regulations and changes that end up costing you more money are sometimes annoying, they are also necessary. Considering that the global warming implications of the previous R134A are about 1400 times the impact of this new R1234yf freon, it's worth it.

The most important part is treating your vehicle well. Get onto a regular maintenance schedule. Budget for your inevitable recharge in the future. The more you take care of your vehicle, the less likely you'll be caught with an unexpected repair.

Having trouble with your vehicle? AC not running so cool? Bring your car into the experts here at Auto & Fleet Mechanic. We have been keeping the Modesto, California area running since the last millennium.

Not sure what service your car may need? Request an appointment with us today and we will get you back on the road safely and quickly.

Additionally, we are offering an incentive for first-time customers when they sign up here.

Judi Harvey
Auto & Fleet MechanicModesto Auto Repair

$$$

5160 Pentecost Drive #C, Modesto, CA 95356209-543-7575info@autoandfleetmechanic.com
Mon:07:30am - 05:30pm
Tue:07:30am - 05:30pm
Wed:07:30am - 05:30pm
Thu:07:30am - 05:30pm
Fri:07:30am - 05:00pm
Sat:Closed
Sun:Closed
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